Topics

Archive

Short Stay in Rwanda

Farm land

After the rain forest, The Rwandan landscape is a patchwork of farms. But the road is all paved and you can see electric lines in some areas. Pretty modern for this corner of the world.

We ended up only spending one day in Rwanda, since hiring a car with short notice on a Saturday is impossible. But we got some great gifts to bring home when we went shopping with Flory. We even made a visit to the Genocide Memorial in Kigali.

We spent the night in a small ministry center with beautiful gardens and of course, no hot water.

Ministry Center

Flory left to use the internet Cafe and we decided to settle in. The room did not seem to have been used in a while, there was a very large dead cockroach in the tub – not like American tubs, really just a drain on the floor. I volunteered Tammy to get rid of it, and gave her some tissue. She screamed as she grabbed it-the thing was alive! She yelled for me to open the door and thew it out as quickly as possible.

As we closed the curtains for the night we found a little friend intending to spend the night with us. I rushed outside and found Patrick, a young man from the UK who was there to teach English to the Genocide survivors. He took the time to shoo the Gecko out of the Room.

Heroically, and humanly removing the gecko

After he left, we found another gecko in the bathroom. Tammy was beside herself by this point. No hot water and a room full of critters. We waited for Flory to return. He laughed at us for being scared of a gecko and calmly beat the poor thing to death.

We spent the next day in the city of Kigali tracking down baskets and other souvenirs. I even gave Flory a pair of sunglasses so he could be a tourist with us. It was the first time we had worn pants since arriving in DC. Here is a city view and the famous Hotel Rwanda hotel:

View from the memorial

Hotel Rwanda

The following two tabs change content below.
Jennifer Vanderlaan CNM MPH is the author of the BirthingNaturally.net website. She has been working with expectant families since 2000, training doulas, childbirth educators, and midwives. She has worked with midwives in Central America and Sub-Saharan Africa. Her interest in public health grew in 2010, and she is now a PhD student learning to become a producer of knowledge.

Latest posts by Jennifer Vanderlaan (see all)

Tags: ,