Topics

Join our e-Mailing List

Archive

Choosing a Training, Pt. 2

Sep 15th, 2010 Training

I realize yesterday’s assignment may have been a bit more than you could complete in one day.  That is OK.  Continue to work on it as long as it takes, and when you are ready, begin this second part.

You now have a list of training programs that includes their cost and a pretty accurate estimation of how long it will take you to complete the program. This is important, because this is your investment list.  The time and money you put into your training are an investment into the business you are planning to start.  To determine which of these is your best investment, you will need to decide what type of “return” you will get on that investment.

These are your possible returns on your training investment, in no particular order (because individuals will place a different value on each one.)

Number of customers:

  • Do any of the programs offer marketing  help to increase your number of customers?
  • Do any of the programs have better or worse reputations with families in your region?
  • Do any of the programs have better or worse reputations with caregiver in your region?
  • Do any of the programs prepare you to work with special populations?
  • Do any of the programs prepare you to work within a hospital, birth center or other organization with a built-in customer base?

Size of income:

  • Do any of the programs change the amount of fees you would or could charge?
  • Do any of the programs require you to purchase their materials from your service fees, cutting down your profit?
  • Do any of the programs prepare to you be hired by an organization for a set salary instead of relying on securing customers yourself?
  • Do any of the programs limit the amount you would be able to charge?

Continuing Education:

  • Do any of the programs provide ways for you to enhance your skills such as advanced trainings, webinars, chat groups or mentoring?
  • Do any of the programs provide regular research updates?
  • Do any of the programs provide newsletters, journals or other written education materials?
  • Do any of the programs meet prerequisites for additional trainings you may like in the future?

Community Needs:

  • Do any of the programs better prepare you to meet the unique needs in your community?
  • Do any of the programs coordinate  easily with other community services?

Networking:

  • Do any of the programs have built in networking through websites or other technology?
  • Do any of the programs have a network already existing in your community?
  • Do any of the programs provide strategies for building networks in your community?
  • Do any of the programs prepare you to work politically in your community?

Materials:

  • Does the quality of the recommended or required materials for any program sand out as exceptionally good or exceptionally bad?
  • Do any of the programs require you to work with only certain materials or offer you freedom to work with whatever materials you choose?
  • Do any of the programs have a specific curriculum, program or service contract from which you cannot deviate?
  • Do any of the programs provide you with access to free materials?

As you work through these lists you are sure to come up with even more questions to ask yourself as you compare programs.  At this point you should have an idea which program will best meet your needs.  Tomorrow we will work through the last step.

The following two tabs change content below.
Jennifer Vanderlaan CNM MPH is the author of the BirthingNaturally.net website. She has been working with expectant families since 2000, training doulas, childbirth educators, and midwives. She has worked with midwives in Central America and Sub-Saharan Africa. Her interest in public health grew in 2010, and she is now a PhD student learning to become a producer of knowledge.

Latest posts by Jennifer Vanderlaan (see all)

Tags: