Topics

Join our e-Mailing List

Archive

Archives

Archive by Jennifer Vanderlaan

Why we use statistics

You’ve designed your study, recruited a sample and collected data. Maybe your study finds 20% of the women who gave birth at a birth center had at least a second degree tear, while 25% of the women who gave birth at a hospital had at least a second degree tear.  The next question you need […]

Comments Off

June 2014 Highlights

Here are some updates from around the birth world… Advocacy The National Partnership for Women and Families released its report: Expecting Better: A State by State Analysis of Laws that Help New Parents. Midwives Alliance of North America released the I am a Midwife Education Campaign. Her Royal Highness Princess Sarah Zeid of Jordan wrote […]

Comments Off

Types of Studies

No doubt you’ve seen something like this hierarchy of studies from Duke University’s Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice site. In this hierarchy, the studies are classified by the type of sample used. Types of Samples In a case study or case report, the sample is one or two individuals who experienced something unusual or noteworthy. In a […]

Comments Off

Disparities

When we compare two populations and find a difference in a health outcome, we want to look more closely to determine if that outcome difference is due to a difference in health related characteristics or non-health related characteristics.  When the difference is due to something other than health characteristics, the difference is considered a disparity. […]

Comments Off

AWHONN Convention

Today was the opening of the AWHONN Annual Convention.  This is my first time at AWHONN, so I am curious about how they do things.  So far I have found the conversations easier to start than at the ICM Congress — but remember, these are all American Nurses so we have a commonality in training, […]

Comments Off

Populations and Risk

Last time we talked about the difference between incidence and prevalence.  Today, we will look at how we can use these descriptive measures to understand differences in risk. Remember from Monday that the population is the group of individuals you would like to learn about. As midwives, we are often interested in specific groups of […]

Comments Off

Call For Abstracts

ACNM sent out the call for Abstracts for the 60th Annual Meeting yesterday. If you are a member you should have received the email. Full details can be found at the ACNM site. If not, look for updates at the ACNM website.

Comments Off

Understanding Data – the measure

We need to talk about what might be considered the “back end” of statistics. That is, how did the data come to be? Types of Observations Data is simply a collection of variables, grouped by observation.  In health care, the observation is usually a “case” or a “person”. Researchers make each observation in a variety […]

Comments Off

Learning to Read Carefully

I ran into an infographic titled A Breakdown of Birth in the U.S.A. I wanted to like it, but the information on the poster is misleading. It does make a great little demonstration of  how to learn to question what you read. If you haven’t opened the infographic yet, put it in a new window […]

Comments Off

Descriptive Statistics

Most of the research we are interested in as midwives is inferential – meaning we draw conclusions about a group of people based on the results.  However, descriptive statistics are still very helpful. Descriptive statistics help us organize and summarize information.  For example, the number of births attended by midwives is a descriptive statistic. We […]

Comments Off

« Previous PageNext Page »