I meet many childbirth professionals who are interested in global health. I often find their understanding of the issues facing women globally is based on old data or common myths. Here is an opportunity to learn about maternal and newborn health in low and middle income countries.  Check it out. Childbirth: A Global Perspective | Coursera.Read More →

I was reading one of the original publications on the three delays to care in childbirth emergencies this morning, and was struck with an unpleasant thought. First, let me acquaint any readers who have not heard of them with the three delays. It is a framework for thinking about and dealing with the problems that lead to increased maternal mortality.  It has generally been applied to women living in low resource settings. The first delay is the wait time between the problem occurring and the woman or those with her recognizing there is a problem. This generally has to do with lack of education andRead More →

I’m updating the directory this week, a very boring task involving staring at a computer screen and writing code…….yawn. But in the midst of these updates I do more research, look for more resources and find more information about midwifery in places I don’t live…like Canada. Here in the US, midwifery is regulated at the state level.  This means laws can be very different depending on where you live.  This is not a problem unique to the United States.  Canada’s midwifery laws are province specific and create equal havoc for Canadian families. Check out this summary of current midwifery laws. Not being Canadian, I don’tRead More →

I should never work on the website when I’m tired.  Last night I crashed the International Midwife blog by selecting to install an update that was only a BETA and was not compatible with my webhost.  Opps. The blog became a lost cause, with no way to revert to the previous version.  To make matters worse, the coding messed up the other blogs making them unaccessable. No, I didn’t really have time for a problem this week.  I am, however, clever.  I exported the posts and imported them here.  So now this blog is a bit mixed, and the links on the website need toRead More →

The photo is sideways, but this is my latest read. Yes, it’s a little old- 1998 copyright. But my reproductive program management instructor recommended it, and I trust him. The book chronicles the global burden of disease from reproduction, and is an attempt to begin defining the scope of reproductive health. I already took a class that introduced me to the major indicators used in reproductive health, but I expect this will help me understand more about how to make measurements work, and to identify problems with published numbers. Of particulate interest is the inclusion of problems from the misuse of technology. I am eagerRead More →

After a little digging I found Midwife International, another international training program for midwives. This one is open to would-be midwives and midwife preceptors from all faith backgrounds, however the time commitment is a bit longer.  I don’t have any experience with this organization, so be sure to let me know how it goes if you work with them.Read More →

This semester I have the privilege to do my clinical hours in a public hospital in Tanzania. What a fabulous way to end this part of my journey! Knowing that I have not yet been in the country for two weeks, you might be wondering what I’m thinking.  Knowing that I actually do have classes three days a week, and that a trip to Tanzania will take at least two weeks, you might have decided I’m crazy.  I admit, it is possible I have made a terrible decision. It is also possible this will be the most fabulous opportunity I have had yet. At present I haveRead More →

For the last two weeks, this has been keeping me in limbo: What you see is a laptop harddrive. The exact make and model of the harddrive that was once in my laptop and is once again in my laptop.  It’s what you can’t see that makes all the difference. The harddrive is the location of every bit of information on a computer.  Every powerpoint presentation I took notes on in class.  Every paper I wrote.  Every customer who bought books. Every piece of data for my theses, including the preliminary maps, every journal article and its review sheet and citation already entered into EndNote.Read More →

The school of public health arranges a luncheon for all the dual degree candidates each fall.  It allows those of us from different programs to meet each other.  By far, the largest number of dual degree candidates is from the medical school (they have 26 this year), and most of them are in the epidemiology department.  But there are other candidates from the physician’s assistant school, business school, law school, last year I had a class with a dual degree from the school of theology and this year I meed a dual candidate from the physical therapy school. This year, there are 11 MSN/MPH candidates in residence in theRead More →

I am back from Nairobi, which was an amazingly eye-opening experience.  Check out the Birth in Central Africa blog for highlights and photos from the trip. I took my last final exam of the semester and will be using the next week to get the business back in order before I dive into more school work. I’ve cleaned out my twitter, rearranging the way I see my feeds.  I’ve set up charts to ensure I am posting when I think I am for the Facebook pages.  I’m even working on the finances–my least favorite job. But getting my work done has it’s advantages.  For example,Read More →